Overview

There is a need to further reduce mortality and harm experienced by people in Scotland’s acute hospitals.

Service Description

The Acute Adult programme works to reduce harm and mortality for patients in hospitals. Since the launch of the programme in 2008 there has been a tangible impact on patient outcomes such as the reduction of infection rates for ventilator associated pneumonia and central line bloodstream infections. There has also been the widespread implementation of safety briefs, daily goal-setting in intensive care units and surgical brief and pause, which ensures it is safe for an operation to proceed. Current work includes improving the recognition and treatment of deteriorating patients, the recognition and management of sepsis, reducing falls, reducing catheter associated urinary tract infections and reducing pressure ulcers. The programme has contributed to a reduction in hospital standardised mortality of 16.5% and reduction in mortality from sepsis of 21%.

Status

The Acute Adult programme is open to all NHS boards. Current work includes improving the recognition and treatment of deteriorating patients, the recognition and management of sepsis, reducing falls, reducing catheter associated urinary tract infections and reducing pressure ulcers.

Audience

NHS boards – acute hospitals

Benefits of programme

Since the start of the Acute Adult Programme in 2008 SPSP has contributed to

  • a reduction in Hospital Standardised Mortality Rate (HSMR) of 15.7% from 2007 baseline
  • a 21% reduction in 30 day mortality Sepsis using for ICD-10 A40/41 sepsis codes
  • a reduction of 17% in cardiac arrest rate for 12 of 22 hospitals that have reported consistently from February 2012 to May 2015
  • a reduced rate of falls with harm for six boards reporting between January 2014 and June 2015.

Contact

Alison Hunter

alisonhunter4@nhs.net